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Happy Birthday Governor Thayer!

Today is the birthday of a Civil War general, lawyer and governor of both Wyoming Territory and the State of Nebraska.

(WSA Sub Neg 4010, P97-19/1)

(WSA Sub Neg 4010, P97-19/1)

The second Wyoming territorial governor was born at Bellingham, Massachusetts on January 24, 1820.  John Milton Thayer’s early life consisted of farming, with school attendance filling the winter months.  He was admitted to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island when he was 17.    After graduating in 1841, Thayer worked in a Worcester, Massachusetts law office.   He also began what would be an intermittent but accomplished military career when he joined a “light infantry” company of the Massachusetts Militia.  He married Mary Torrey Allen in 1842. Thayer also holds the distinction of being the earliest born governor of Wyoming, though not the oldest to take office.

When the Kansas-Nebraska Act opened up new territories for settlement in 1854, Thayer traveled to Nebraska in the summer of that year to view the country.  He liked what he saw and brought Ms. Thayer to the new territory in the fall.  They eventually settled in Omaha.   In January 1855, Thayer was appointed Brigadier General of the 1st Brigade of the Nebraska Militia.  The appointment was supported by legislative commission the following month.  One year later he was commissioned Major General.  He served six years and was embroiled to varying degrees in struggles with regional Indian tribes.

As governor, Thayer's military background ensured that he would do his best to arm the territory's militia to the best of his ability.  (WSA Gov Thayer Guebernatorial papers, delivery of arms to the territory, 1876)

As governor, Thayer’s military background ensured that he would do his best to arm the territory’s militia to the best of his ability.
(WSA Gov Thayer Guebernatorial papers, delivery of arms to the territory, 1876)

After failed attempts at gaining seats in the territorial legislature and Congress, Thayer was elected to the Nebraska Territorial Council in 1860.   When the Civil War began, Thayer contacted the Secretary of War, asking that a regiment be assigned to Nebraska.  Subsequently, the First Nebraska Regiment was organized, commanded by Colonel John Thayer.  The regiment served in the western theater, including two years under General Ulysses Grant.  Thayer is reported to have distinguished himself during several engagements, including Fort Donelson and Shiloh.  His war record served him well as he returned to the Nebraska political arena.    He was elected by the territorial legislature to fill one of two U.S. Senate seats, and began in that service in March 1867.   Thayer was noted for his input regarding Indian issues, and for his work in getting confirmation of Omaha land titles and acquiring a federal land district for Nebraska.

Thayer was defeated in senatorial elections in 1871 and 1875.  However, President Grant kept his former comrade in arms in public service by appointing him Governor of Wyoming Territory.  The Cheyenne Daily Leader welcomed the appointment, stating “The new Governor is well known to the people of Wyoming, for he has for many years been identified with the interests of the far west, and especially of this territory.”  The editor felt Thayer’s “experience as a legislator, his extensive acquaintance with the leading men of the nation and his personal popularity with the authorities at Washington” would benefit the young Territory.

As governor, it was Thayer's job to see that the newly created seats in the Territorial Assembly were equally apportioned. A copy of his proclaimation was printed in this 1874 newspaper clipping.  (WSA Gov Thayer gubernatorial papers, apportionment)

As governor, it was Thayer’s job to see that the newly created seats in the Territorial Assembly were equally apportioned. A copy of his proclamation was printed in this 1874 newspaper clipping.
(WSA Gov Thayer gubernatorial papers, apportionment)

In his 1875 message to the Wyoming Territorial Assembly, Thayer, Republican that he was, spoke on the need to reduce taxation and the expenses of county governments.   He also supported the preservation of game animals, stocking streams with fish, and limiting taxes on new industries.  Possibly referring to the railroad strikes of 1877, Thayer’s message that year stressed the need for corporate entities and their employees “to appreciate that the interests of each are the interests of the other.”  He also supported the annexation of the western portion of Dakota Territory to Wyoming Territory, citing similar interests of the residents, a suggestion that never bore fruit.

During Thayer's term, Crook County was created by the Territorial Assembly. It would not be organized for 10 years. (WSA Gov Thayer Gubernatorial papers, Crook County organization correspondence)

During Thayer’s term, Crook County was created by the Territorial Assembly. It would not be organized for 10 years.
(WSA Gov Thayer Gubernatorial papers, Crook County organization correspondence)

President Hayes relieved Thayer of his gubernatorial duties in May 1878.  He returned to Nebraska and made his home in Grand Island.  He made one last attempt at Congress in 1883 without success.  However his last foray into politics was successful as he was elected to two consecutive terms as Nebraska’s Governor, 1887-1891.    A contested election delayed Thayer’s retirement from office.  When that issue was settled he traveled to the Eastern U.S. with his ill wife.  She died there in the fall of 1892.  Thayer returned to Nebraska, residing in Lincoln, where he died March 19, 1906, at the age of 86.

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The Short Life of Lacy, Wyoming

In the spring of 1921, surveyors for the Union Pacific Railroad were studying at the land south of Torrington for a proposed route into the Goshen Hole Country.  On their heels were land speculators, several of whom bought the land of Charles Lacy and named a townsite after him.

"Lacy's Corner, 1/2 mile west of Yoder", 1921 (WSA Homesteader Museum Print 19)

“Lacy’s Corner, 1/2 mile west of Yoder”, 1921
(WSA Homesteader Museum Print 19)

Between March and June, the new town of Lacy quickly took shape.  Among its businesses were two general stores, a bank, two restaurants, a dance hall, and a barbershop.  A post office, community club, and baseball team added to the social life of the fledgling community.  In the offering were a Methodist church, school and a drug store.  “Lacy is still in its infancy,” the Torrington Telegram observed in late June 1921, “but is a lively little place.”

Interestingly, according to early reports, the buildings were not on permanent footings just in case they had to be moved.  Three nearby communities – Mason, Springer and Yoder, all near Lacy – hoped the railroad would come through their respective areas.  But as the summer progressed, the future of Lacy looked bright.  Because land owners were in close contact with railroad officials, the prospect of the railroad coming through Lacy seemed certain.

But it was not meant to be.

In June 1921, railroad officials decided to locate the route through Yoder, one quarter mile northeast of Lacy.  On July 4th, the buildings were moved and the town of Lacy was no more.

(WSA Torrington Telegram July 7, 1921 p1)

(WSA Torrington Telegram July 7, 1921 p1)

— Carl Hallberg, Reference Archivist

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Happy Veteran’s Day!

In honor of Veteran’s day, the Wyoming State Archives will be closed tomorrow, November 11th. A big thank you to all past and present service members for your sacrifice.

"C Battery Boys at Hohr, Germany", 1917-1919. Note the bucking horse stencil that designated the Wyoming troops' unit. (WSA No Neg, real photo postcard)

“C Battery Boys at Hohr, Germany”, 1917-1919. Note the bucking horse stencil that designated the Wyoming troops’ unit.
(WSA No Neg, real photo postcard)

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This Day is Wyoming History… Happy Birthday Governor & Senator Barrett

Today is the birthday of former governor, US Senator and World War I veteran Frank Barrett.

No Neg, P73-3-2, H65-208-2, Frank Barrett portrait, with handwritten comments

Happy Birthday to Wyoming Governor and Senator Frank Barrett!
(WSA P73-3/2)

Frank A. Barrett was born in Omaha, Nebraska on November 10, 1892. He resided in Omaha during the early years of his life, graduating from hometown Creighton University in 1913 and from Creighton’s law school in 1916.

Barrett Collection school record examples

Examples of Senator Barrett’s middle and university school records. He presented the speech “A Usable Wage” in Chreighton’s 1913 annual oratorical contest.
(WSA H97-33)

During World War I he served as a Sergeant in the U.S. Army’s Balloon Corps. After the war he married his childhood sweetheart, Alice Donoghue, in 1919. They were married by Father Edward Flanagan, founder of Boys’ Town. Shortly thereafter the young couple moved to Lusk, Wyoming where Frank set up shop as an attorney.

Barrett Print 4, Alice Barrett and children, 1920s-30s

After college, Barrett married his childhood sweetheart, Alice.
(WSA Barrett Print 4, Alice Barrett and children, ca 1928)

Barrett served as Niobrara County Attorney from 1923 to1932. His public service career then shifted to the state legislature, where he served from 1933 to 1935. He lost a 1936 bid for a U.S. Congressional seat, but succeeded in that effort six years later. He served as Wyoming’s Representative until 1950, when he was elected Governor of Wyoming. Historian T.A. Larson noted that while in Congress Barrett “acquired a reputation for folksiness, alertness to the needs of his constituents, and attention to details.”

Barrett Print 64, Gov Barrett at desk in Capitol 1951026

Governor Barrett seated at his desk in the Capitol Building, 1951.
(WSA Barrett Print 64)

Barrett only served two years as Governor of Wyoming, winning election to the U.S. Senate in 1952. He was Senator for six years, but failed in re-election efforts in 1958 and 1960. Senator Barrett died on May 30, 1962.

H97-33, Congressional Records and Senate report by Barrett023

Three opinions and reports given by Barrett during his time as US Senator.
(WSA H97-33)

The records of Governor Barrett maintained by the Wyoming State Archives consist of subject files maintained by his staff. Through correspondence, reports and meeting minutes, the files document interaction with state officials and agencies, and cover issues of concern to the state at that time.

Sub Neg 176 deriv, Sen Barrett attaching name plate made by Mrs Opal Templeton of Lusk

Senator Barrett attaching the bucking horse name plate made by Mrs Opal Templeton of Lusk to his office door.
(WSA Sub Neg 176)

Personal papers and political records of Senator Barrett are also held by the State Archives. These are cataloged as collection H97-33. Much of the collection deals with Senator Barrett’s political career and concurrent events. However, the collection also documents the activities and accomplishments of the family from Senator Barrett’s youth to the careers of his children, Frank A. Barrett, a surgeon; James Emmett Barrett, a federal judge; and Marialyce Tobin, an attorney.

H97-33, Home & School Speaker cover and example page

This child’s speech textbook was given to Barrett in 1901, according to the inscription. It is a “practical manual of delsarte exercises and elocution” complete with diagrams of gestures. Perhaps this book helped the young Barrett to develop the skills that served him so well as both a lawyer and a politician.
(WSA H97-33)

These collections document the lives of one of Wyoming’s most influential families, and events and issues which impacted the state during the mid-years of the 20th century.

Barrett Neg 87 derivative, Barrett family photo, 1951

Governor and his family at the Governor’s Mansion in Cheyenne, 1951.
(WSA Barrett Print 87)

— Curtis Greubel, Wyoming State Imaging Center Supervisor

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The Sweet Sound of… Saxophones!

Today is national saxophone day! Why November 6th? Because that is the birthday of Adolphe Sax, the Belgian inventor of the saxophone. And today happens to be his 200th birthday. Incidentally, today is also the 160th birthday of John Phillip Sousa, legendary march composer and promoter of saxophone use in bands.

In honor of both of these men, we bring you the O.P. Thayer Saxophone Band of Rock Springs!

The OP Thayer Saxophone Band shows off their new maroon uniforms in front of the Rock Springs City Hall, ca 1902. (WSA Sweetwater Museum Collection Sub Neg 5550)

The O.P. Thayer Saxophone Band shows off their new maroon uniforms in front of the Rock Springs City Hall, ca 1902. The large instrument in the front row, far right is the first bass saxophone manufactured by the Conn musical instrument company.
(WSA Sweetwater County Museum Collection Sub Neg 5550)

(WSA Rock Springs Rocket  10/9/1902 p4)

One of the first concerts given by the Saxophone Band(WSA Rock Springs Rocket 10/9/1902 p4)

Born in Massachusetts around 1875, Oliver “Ollie” Pearson Thayer, moved with his family to Rock Springs around 1877. In high school, he played in the band and orchestra, often with his sister Mary. For a while in his late teens-early twenties, Thayer dabbled in professional photography but found his calling in music.

Around 1902, he organized his saxophone band, possibly the first of its kind in the nation. The group often serenaded the residents of Rock Springs at concerts, dances, community events, commencements, weddings, for visiting dignitaries and even at a few funerals. The band received rave reviews from local and national press. Thayer’s band also received the first bass saxophone produced by the Conn company, a leading instrument manufacturer. By the 1910s, saxophone bands had sprung up all around the country.

Thayer Fremont Clipper July 10, 1903, page 4

(WSA Fremont Clipper 7/10/1903 p4)

1903 seems to have been the height of the band’s popularity, though they continued to perform until about 1905. During the summer of 1903, the band traveled to Fort Washakie, Lander and Atlantic City and entertained President Theodore Roosevelt during his visit to Evanston that year as part of a three day trip through Wyoming on his way back from the West Coast.

Thayer Wyoming Press May 30, 1903, page 9

(WSA Wyoming Press 5/30/1903 p9)

In addition to leading various bands and orchestras in the Rock Springs area, Thayer also composed several pieces of music.

O.P. Thayer composed several pieces of music including this 1909 march and two step, punctuated by "Indian yells." Unfortunately, he used a photo of Shoshone chief Washakie to illustrate his "Sioux" war dance. (WSA H2012-10)

O.P. Thayer composed several pieces of music including this 1906 piece punctuated by “Indian yells.” Unfortunately, he used a photo of Shoshone chief Washakie to illustrate his “Sioux” war dance. Most of his compositions seem to have been marches and/or two steps.
(WSA H2012-10)

Thayer and his family moved to Havre, Montana in 1914 but kept in contact with their family and many of their friends in Rock Springs. By 1932, he and his family had moved to Redlands, California where he directed the school band and orchestra. Thayer died in California in 1957.

 

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!yaD etisoppO yppaH

We regret to inform you that today is Opposite Day! To celebrate, we’d like to share a letter from the collection, written (how else?) backwards.

This letter was written November 8, 1878, from “George” to his brother “Jim” while George was recovering from a steamboat accident near  that almost took off his right arm. George tells his brother that he regrets that he cannot write a longer letter, but he is writing with his left hand and thus backwards.

MSS 589 p1, Steamboat injury, left hand letter, 1878

(WSA MSS 589 p1)

MSS 589 p2, Steamboat injury, left hand letter, 1878

(WSA MSS 589 p2)

MSS 589 p3, Steamboat injury, left hand letter, 1878

(WSA MSS 589 p3)

 

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How To Make A Mattress

Not satisfied with the commercially produced mattresses available today? Have you ever wonder how to make your own? Well thank goodness the Wyoming Agricultural Extension Service (now the University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service) can help! Since 1914, in addition to providing advice on livestock and crops, the Extension Service provided folks with demonstrations and workshops on everything from canning garden produce and sewing clothes to how to use color in home decoration and how to refinish furniture. In this series of photos from the 1940s, Wyoming Home Economics Specialist Pauline Bunting helps an unidentified community group stitch and stuff mattresses.

Between 1987 and 1989, the Wyoming Extension Homemaker’s Council interviewed many of the long time homemakers club members  about their experiences with homemakers extension clubs over the years. Many of these women started in the clubs in the 1930s and 1940s as new brides. Several mentioned community mattress making projects and demonstrations like this one during their club days, and especially during the early 1940s and World War II.

In the fall of the year we used to make mattresses. We went to the community hall, everyone in the neighborhood that needed mattresses. The government would furnish the cotton and the material for the mattresses, but we had instructions that showed us how to make ’em. We could make about four mattresses at a time… I can’t remember how long it took us to make a mattress, three days I think. By the time we got finished, everyone [had] a mattress… [Folks came by] Model T’s or team and wagon or whatever. Some of them came on horseback. We’d take our lunch and stay all day. We were pretty tired at the end of the day. — Mabel Doris Hageman of Douglas, Wyoming (H98-44 Box 4)

The first step was to make patterns and cut out the ticking for the mattress covers. Ticking is the sturdy cotton fabric used for mattress and pillow covers. It is usually off-white with brightly colored pin-stripping.

(WSA P2008-10/81)

(WSA P2008-10/81)

Here an extension agent helps a man sew the ticking together for the mattress cover. They are wearing bandannas over their noses so they do not breath in the fine cotton dust.

(WSA P2008-10/82)

(WSA P2008-10/82)

Weighing cotton for stuffing the mattresses. Notice the bandannas again. Cotton came in large bats and the cotton was weighed out to ensure each mattress received its fair share. According to a 1940s USDA circular, 50 pounds of cotton went into each mattress.

(WSA P2008-10/83)

(WSA P2008-10/83)

Rolling out the cotton onto the ticking. Rolling rather than stuffing produced a more even mattress.

(WSA P2008-10/84)

(WSA P2008-10/84)

Then it is time to add the top ticking and stitch it to the sides. The stick that is waiving in the foreground is a broomstick used to beat out the lumps in the stuffing.

We’d go down there and we’d take our broom, and I suppose you’re wondering how a broom helped? We had to beat ’em when we got those layers in. We had to beat those layers of cotton so long to mat ’em together. — Mabel Doris Hageman

(WSA P2008-10/85)

(WSA P2008-10/85)

After the ticking is sewn closed, a welt was sewn around the edges to give it shape and keep it square. Look how handy these men are with those long needles!

(WSA P2008-10/86)

(WSA P2008-10/86)

Almost done!

(WSA P2008-10/87)

(WSA P2008-10/87)

The mattress was then couched to keep the stuffing from shifting. Couching is a process where you attach buttons to each side of the mattress and pull them tightly together. The buttons keep the thread from pulling or wearing holes in the fabric.

(WSA P2008-10/88)

(WSA P2008-10/88)

The finished mattress is ready for a bed and a good night’s sleep after all that work.

(WSA P2008-10/89)

(WSA P2008-10/89)

For more information, take a look at this wonderful  ca 1940 circular from the USDA encouraging farm families, especially in the south, to turn surplus cotton into mattresses. Thanks to our friends at the National Agricultural Library Special Collections for digitizing this gem!

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Green River County?: A Pre-Territorial Docket Book

 

The volume called "Records of the Probate Court, Green River, UT" is one of the oldest documents in the Wyoming State Archives. Its first entry predates Wyoming Territory by 8 years.

The first entry in “Records of the Probate Court, Green River, UT” predates Wyoming Territory by 8 years.

One of the oldest local government records in the Wyoming State Archives dates from the years before Wyoming Territory was created.  The bound volume is titled “Records of the Probate Court, Green River County, U.T. [Utah Territory],” and covers the years 1861 to 1871.  The southwest corner of what would be Wyoming was part of Utah Territory for 18 years prior to July 25, 1868, when Wyoming Territory was created.  In addition to recordings related to probate matters, the volume includes information normally maintained by a county clerk.

One of the very first cases handled by the  probate court of Green River County was to settle the estate of Michael Martin in 1861. Looking at a portion of the inventory of his estate, it appears that he ran a general store.   Bolts of cloth, jars of pickles, barrels of crackers, tobacco and pipes, cans of fruit and even "stomach bitters" appear on the list along with their valuation.

One of the very first cases handled by the probate court of Green River County was to settle the estate of Michael Martin in 1861. Looking at a portion of the inventory of his estate, it appears that he ran a general store. Bolts of cloth, jars of pickles, barrels of crackers, tobacco and pipes, cans of fruit and even “stomach bitters” appear on the list along with their valuation.

Only that portion of the volume from 1861 to 1866 pertains to probate proceedings.  Famed Fort Bridger sutler William A. Carter was the Probate Judge during this time. His son-in-law, James Van Allen Carter (no relation before  marriage), served as Clerk of Court.  Entries refer to filings and proceedings related to wills, inventories and appraisements, and the settlement of estates.  There is also mention of a divorce case considered in probate court in 1866. (In modern courts, divorces are handled by the civil court)

In 1869, the County Clerk recorded the contract between Charles P. Regan and James Bright for the sale of the Fort Bridger Brewery. Bright paid $2,500, which is equivalent to approximately $43,000 today.

In 1869, the County Clerk recorded the contract between Charles P. Regan and James Bright for the sale of the Fort Bridger Brewery. Bright promised to pay $2,500, which is equivalent to approximately $43,000 today.

Much of the volume contains records of the County Clerk.  A variety of instruments were recorded, such as homestead claims, mining claims, chattel mortgages, bills of sale, powers of attorneys, and a lengthy record concerning the issuing of bonds for the Union Pacific Railroad. Some references are made to the re‑recording of these records in volumes maintained by the county clerk, which is probably the newly created Uinta County Clerk.  An index is included at the beginning of the volume.  Overall, the record provides information about early settlement and property holders in the southwest corner of Wyoming.

— Curtis Greubel, Wyoming State Imaging Center Supervisor

This map, filed with the county clerk, shows the location of the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak (COC &PP) Express Company.

This map, filed with the county clerk, shows the location of the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak (COC &PP) Express Company in 1862.

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Wyoming Day Questions (& Answers)

In honor of the Wyoming Day festivities at the Historic Governor’s Mansion in Cheyenne, the Wyoming Tribune Eagle published five questions yesterday about Wyoming. For those who are interested, here is “the rest of the story.”

1. What is Wyoming’s “almost” state cookie?

The Chocolate Chip Cookie almost became our official state cookie in 1995. House Bill 158 was introduced in the by Representative James C. Hageman of Goshen County, but died in the general file. The legislation even included a proposed official recipe:

(i) The following ingredients:

(A) One (1) cup granulated sugar;
(B) One (1) cup brown sugar;
(C) Two-thirds (2/3) cup butter or
(D) Two-thirds (2/3) cup shortening;
(E) Two (2) eggs;
(F) Two (2) teaspoons vanilla;
(G) Three (3) cups flour;
(H) One (1) teaspoon soda;
(J) One (1) Teaspoon salt;
(K) one (1) twelve (12) ounce package of chocolate chips.

(ii) Mixed and baked as follows:

(A) Cream sugars, butter or margarine and shortening together;
(B) Add eggs and vanilla and mix well;
(C) Sift together remaining ingredients, add to creamed mixture and mix well;
(D) Bake eight (8) to ten (10) minutes at three hundred seventy-five (375) degrees Fahrenheit.

2. Who sent the telegram informing Wyoming of statehood?

During the summer of 1890, Territorial Governor Francis E. Warren traveled to Washington, DC, to help lobby for support of Wyoming statehood in Congress. Congress seemed favorably disposed toward adding states to the union, having added North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington and Montana in November 1889.

The first official step toward statehood had come in February 1888 when the Territorial Assembly passed a jointed resolution asking Congress  for legislation that would enable to people of Wyoming to draft a constitution and organize as a state. Though several members questioned Wyoming’s readiness in terms of finances and population, Governor Warren, Wyoming’s lone congressional delegate Joseph M. Carey, and several of Wyoming’s political heavyweights campaigned mightily.

The bill for statehood was introduced into the House of Representatives by Carey in December 1889. Desipite much vocal support, it was not until July 10, 1890 that an act was finally signed into law by President Benjamin Harrison. That same day, Carey sent a telegram to Acting Governor (Territorial Secretary) John Meldrum announcing the news.

Telegram announcing statehood sent by Senator Carey in Washington DC to Acting Governor John W. Meldrum (WSA Secretary of State record group, Constitutional Convention)

Telegram announcing statehood sent by Senator Carey in Washington DC to Acting Governor John W. Meldrum
(WSA Secretary of State record group, Constitutional Convention)

3. The Cheyenne Daily Sun used what color ink to celebrate Statehood?

In 1890, nearly every newspaper was published using black ink but the Cheyenne Daily Sun changed things up a bit to celebrate statehood. They used red and blue ink throughout the 8 page paper on June 29th. This issue reported the passage of the statehood bill in both the Senate and House of Representatives. All that remained was a signature by President Harrison, which was assumed to be imminent.

Colored inks were more costly than the standard black and dual tone copy, like the red and blue used that day, were also more labor intensive than using a single color. But it was well worth the extra cost and time to celebrate such a momentous occasion.

The Cheyenne Daily Sun printed their June 29th, 1890 issue in red and blue ink to celebrate statehood.

The Cheyenne Daily Sun printed their June 29th, 1890 issue in red and blue ink to celebrate statehood.

 

4. The official Wyoming 44 star flag was presented by whom?

Esther Morris presented the official 44-star American flagon behalf of the women of Wyoming to Governor F.E. Warren at the statehood celebration on July 23, 1890.  Money was contributed by women around the then territory and covered the cost of the flag. Co K of the Wyoming Girl Guards was the guard of honor for the flag.

Cover of the booklet listing all of the women who contributed to the purchase of the 44-star flag presented during the statehood celebration in 1890.  (WSA P2004-8)

Cover of the booklet listing all of the women who contributed to the purchase of the 44-star flag presented during the statehood celebration in 1890.
(WSA P2004-8)

 

5. How long was the original Wyoming State Constitution?

The original Wyoming State constitution includes 40 hand-written pages. Wyoming’s constitution is one of the longest in the nation and includes over 300 sections. It is nearly 5 times longer that the United States Constitution!

Preamble of the original, hand-written Wyoming Constitution. (WSA Secretary of State RG)

Preamble of the original, hand-written Wyoming Constitution.
(WSA Secretary of State RG)

Don’t forget to stop by the Historic Governor’s Mansion tomorrow, June 21st, to join in the fun!

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Reminder: Archives Closed Monday

Just a reminder, the Wyoming State Archives will be closed on Monday, May 26th.

Our staff wishes you and yours a safe and happy Memorial Day Weekend!

 

Summer is here! (WSA P2008-41/4, Kindergarden class running toward the camera, 1950s)

Summer is here!
(WSA P2008-41/4, Kindergarten class running toward the camera, 1950s)

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