Tag Archives: Recipe

Friday Foodie: Crumbs in the Cream

Homespun Ice Cream
Mrs. Twidale, Lost Cabin

Dry whole wheat muffins or bread and put through fine food chopper. To one cup of the crumbs, add one cup of brown sugar, one quart of thin cream, two teaspoons vanilla, few grains salt and a quarter cup of coconut or nuts ground with the crumbs. Freeze.

As odd as this recipe sounds to modern American palates, it dates back to Victorian England and has a strong following in modern Ireland where it is best known as brown bread ice cream. The question is, how did it come to Fremont County in 1929?

Twidale 2

Ethel’s recipe for ice cream appears on the very bottom of the front page of this Fremont County Extension newsletter as a part of their suggested Thanksgiving Menu. (WSA Fremont County Clerk, Home Demonstration Agent Annual Report, 1929)

Mrs. Ethel Cleworth Twidale was born in England in 1880. She married Joseph W. Twidale on March 12, 1910 in Manchester, England. Their honeymoon must have been their voyage to the US, because they arrived New York City in April and were in West Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming, just in time to be enumerated in the Federal census on May 12-14.

Twidale NY Passenger List from Ancestry copy

Joseph and Ethel arrived in New York on April 2, 1910 on the ship Campania. They gave their destination as Casper, Wyoming. (New York passenger List, Ancestry.com)

Born in 1877, Joseph was the 2nd son of a farmer with 8 other children. Ethel interesting is listed as a “spinster” on her marriage record. She was 30 years old at the time. The couple followed Joseph’s younger brothers Samuel and Frank who came to America in 1905 and settled in Natrona County. In 1915, the couple became US citizens and in 1916, they proved up on their homestead just across the Fremont-Natrona County line from Lysite.

Twidale

County and State Extension Agents often asked for volunteers to allow them to demonstrate new techniques, methods or skills to the local community. The Twidale’s home was used to model landscaping and home beautification by planting native trees and shrubs. The county agent’s 1929 report included the site plan and a photo of the property before work began. (WSA Fremont County Clerk, Home Demonstration Agent Annual Report, 1929)

The family agreed to allow the State Forestry Extension Agent to use their newly built log home to demonstrate ranch beautification. A plan for the planting of trees, bushes, flowers and a clover lawn were included in the Fremont County Extension Agent’s 1929 annual report.

Later in life, the couple moved to Billing and lived on Wyoming Avenue. Joseph died in early 1954 and Ethel in 1959. Both are buried in Billings.

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Friday Foodie: Butterscotch

Today’s Friday Foodie feature come to us from the hand of Francis Eliza Chassell. In 1916, when she was 8 years old, she contributed her recipe for butterscotch candy to The Gillette Cook Book.[1]

Francis was born in Gillette and grew up on the family ranch. She taught in the county after graduating from Campbell County High School. After a couple of years, she decided to continue her education and attended Cornell College in Iowa, where she later married. Francis passed away in 2001.

A heavy wheat crop on the Chassell ranch in 1928. (WSA Kuska Neg 555, photo by Val Kuska)

A heavy wheat crop on the Chassell ranch in 1928.
(WSA Kuska Neg 555, photo by Val Kuska)

Francis’s father Harry J. Chassell was a long time Wyoming legislator serving in the House of Representatives 1909-1913, the Senate 1915-1923, and the House again 1933-1937. Chassell introduced the bill creating Campbell County, which he later represented, in 1911. According to White Eagle, the publisher of the cookbook, Chassell remained grounded, despite his political career. “H.J. Chassell who helps his wife with a day’s washing, cleans stalls or brands calves, has served two terms in the legislature and one as State senator.”

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Butterscotch

Boil together a cup of sugar or maple syrup; 1/2 cup butter, tablespoon vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon soda. When syrup will snap when tested in water pour on buttered plates to cool.

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1. The Gillette Cook Book was reprinted in 1965 by the Campbell County Historical Society. Copies are still available through the Campbell County Rockpile Museum.

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Friday Foodie: Amber Marmalade

Citrus fruit is in season, so how about a recipe to use it! Today’s Friday Foodie recipe comes from Ida D. Foote by way of The Evanston Cook Book of Tested Recipes collected by the Presbyterian Aid Society in Evanston, Wyoming, in 1914.

The four 'Foote' cousins -  Sybil, Helen, Ida, Grace, photo by Charles S. Baker, ca 1915. (WSA Sub Neg 6186)

The four ‘Foote’ cousins – Sybil, Helen, Ida, Grace, photo by Charles S. Baker, ca 1915. 
(WSA Sub Neg 6186)

Ida D. Foote was the daughter of Mark W. and Rose M. Foote. She was born in Indiana in 1878, the oldest and only girl of their four children. In 1916, she married Van A. Rupe in Evanston.

Ida's marriage announcement as published in the Wyoming Press 7-6-1916, p1

Ida’s marriage announcement as published in the Wyoming Press 7-6-1916, p1

Miss Foote contributed several recipes to the book, but today’s feature is her Amber Marmalade.

Shave 1 orange, 1 lemon and 1 grapefruit very thin, rejecting nothing but seeds and core. Measure the fruit and add 3 times the quantity of water. Let stand in an earthen dish over night, and the next morning boil for 10 minutes. Stand another night and second morning add part for part of sugar and fruit. Boil steadily until it jellies. This makes 12 glasses.

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Friday Foodie: Estelle Reel Meyer’s Fruit Cake

Today’s Friday Foodie recipe comes from the scrapbook of Estelle Reel Meyer, the nation’s first woman elected to public office in the United States (Wyoming’s Superintendent of Public Instruction 1894-1898) and Director of Indian Education for the Bureau of Indian Affairs 1898-1910. Her extensive and eclectic scrapbooks also contain various beauty remedies and exercises, eye wash prescriptions and a recipe for a cholera cure.

Estelle Reel Meyer, 1890s (WSA No Neg)

Estelle Reel Meyer, 1890s
(WSA No Neg)

Meyer, Estelle Reel, scrapbook recipe for fruit cake, nd

Estelle’s Fruit Cake

1 pound of sugar
1 pound and a half of flour
16 eggs
Brandy, quarter of a pint
Raisins, 4 pounds
Currents, 2 pounds
1 1/2 teacups molasses
1 spoon full of soda
1 spoon full of cinnamon
1 spoon full of cloves
1 spoon full of nutmeg

Bake 4 hours if all put in one cake.

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Friday Foodie: Governor’s Mansion Hollandaise Sauce

In 1965, First Lady Martha Close Hansen helped to compile a cookbook full of Wyoming family recipes for the 75th anniversary of statehood. This was a special anniversary for Wyoming as there were still many people living who had either seen the original statehood celebration or had heard about it from those who had lived it.

Publicity photo for the Cooking Wyoming cookbook. Mrs. Martha Hansen and three ladies all dressed in period dresses in the Historic Governor's Mansion. The Hansens lived in the house from 1963 to 1967. (WSA Cheyenne Star P83-11/269)

Publicity photo for the Cooking in Wyoming cookbook. Mrs. Martha Hansen and three ladies all dressed in period dresses in the Historic Governor’s Mansion. The Hansens lived in the house from 1963 to 1967.
(WSA Cheyenne Star P83-11/269)

One entire section of the book was dedicated to Wyoming’s first ladies’ recipes and included submissions from Mrs. Robert D. (Julia) Carey, Nellie Tayloe Ross, Mrs. Frank (Jean) Emerson, Mrs. Leslie (Margaret) Miller, Mrs. Nels (Marie) Smith, Mrs. Lester (Emily) Hunt, Mrs. Frank (Alice) Barrett,  Mrs. C.J. (Mabel) Rodgers, Mrs. Milward (Lorna) Simpson, Mrs. Joe (Winifred) Hickey, Mrs. Jack (Leona) Gage,  and  of course Mrs. Cliff (Martha) Hansen.

Cooking in Wyoming, 1965 (WSA 641 H249)

Cooking in Wyoming, 1965
(WSA 641 H249)

Hollandaise Sauce (submitted by Martha Hansen)

When we first came to the [Governor’s] Mansion, Mrs. Conroy, our housekeeper, said that she would try to cook anything we asked her to, except Hollandaise Sauce. We tried this recipe and she has made it successfully every time. We serve it often with vegetables. 

1/2 cup butter  or margarine
1/4 cup hot water
4 egg yolks
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash of cayenne

Melt butter or margarine in top of double boiler over simmering water; stir in hot water. Remove top from heat and set on work surface. Add unbeaten egg yolk all at once; beat with electric or rotary beater 2-3 minutes, or until mixture is almost double in bulk. Stir in lemon juice, salt and cayenne.

Place over simmering water again; cook, stiring constantly, 5 minutes, or until thickened.

(Be sure water in lower part does not touch bottom of upper part or boil at any time during cooking.)

Remove sauce from heat; let stand, uncovered until serving time. To reheat: Place over simmering water again and stir lightly for 2-3 minutes (In reheating, sauce may lose some of its fluffiness but it will keep its golden rich creaminess.)

Fake Hollandaise

If you are in a hurry.

3/4 cup mayonnaise
1/3 cup milk
Salt and pepper
1 teaspoon lemon juice

Cook milk and mayonnaise together in top of double boiler for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Add lemon juice, salt and pepper; stir.

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